PAWS Magazine

Issue 58, Summer 2004

PAWS Notes

AGM

Members, volunteers, and staff gathered at PAWS on June 22 for the organization’s Annual General Meeting. It was a lovely evening, with the meeting held outside on the patio under the trees. The agenda included the 2003 Year in Review, presentation of PAWS’ new strategic vision, values, and goals, and campus tours. In addition, we unveiled a beautiful quilt created by the students at Spruce Primary School. The quilt depicts the more than forty cats and dogs that the students have helped to get adopted since January 2004.

Vehicle Donation

Are you thinking of selling or trading in your old car, boat, motorcycle, trailer or RV? Why not donate it instead. Avoid the hassle of expensive ads, receiving phone calls and price haggling.... and get a charitable gift tax deduction instead. All you have to do is contact Northwest Charity Donation Service at 360.561.6119 and tell them you want the proceeds from your donation to go to the Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS), Lynnwood, Washington. They will assist you with determining the market value of your donation, pick it up free of charge, complete all DMV title transfers, and furnish you with a receipt for tax purposes. After the item is sold they send PAWS the proceeds. So don’t delay; making a charitable contribution is an easy way to help the orphaned and injured animals at PAWS. Thank you!

Bear Cub Update

In the last issue of PAWS News, we reported on a bear cub that PAWS was rehabilitating for the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). We are happy to report that in April, with the assistance of ODFW, PAWS successfully released the cinnamon-colored cub on state forestland in northwestern Oregon. Wendy Ludlow, PAWS Presents auction winner for 2003, attended the release. The bear is being radio tracked, and at last report, was about a mile from the release site in canyon bottomlands. This is a good sign, showing she is able to find food and feels safe in her new surroundings.

Behavior Helpline

Is your dog driving you crazy? Does your cat have an attitude? Who Ya Gonna Call? … PAWS Behavior Helpline!

Challenged by holes dug in your flower beds, a newly shredded couch, wounds from a game of tug-of-war, or presents left on your bed because of a shunned litter box? PAWS Behavior Helpline to the rescue! Every day, dedicated volunteers are waiting and available to take your call - providing resources, education, and counseling.

Most behavioral problems are correctable. Fido and Fluffy do want to please you. As their guardian it is your responsibility to provide them with boundaries, rules and training. Understanding canine characteristics and feline moods isn’t difficult and help is just a phone call away.

The Behavior Helpline is available at 425.787.2500 (x852 for dogs, x605 for cats). More companion animal behavior tips and resources are also available at www.paws.org under the shelter tab.

Creative kids helping PAWS

The students at Spruce Primary School recently celebrated their success in helping the PAWS Shelter find families for homeless animals by presenting a quilt they helped to create to PAWS staff. Each week, Spruce Primary students have been writing creative, humorous, and often emotional stories about two shelter animals. These stories are highlighted on the PAWS Web site home page and have served as a great tool for attracting attention to the needs of these often hard to place, individual animals. This successful community partnership has also received a great deal of media attention. The quilt design includes photos of all the adopted animals, which was a 100% success rate!

Through the project, the children have developed their reading, writing, and computer technology skills while learning about responsible animal care, pet overpopulation issues, and kindness toward all animals. The quilt will be displayed in the PAWS Shelter to remind us about the important role our community plays in supporting the animals at PAWS.

Kittens aren’t taking a holiday this summer

Litters of kittens continue to stream into the shelter, and the PAWS Foster Care Program could really use your help. Last year, this program handled 1,206 animals, and 990 of them were kittens! Many of these kittens just need love, care, and time to socialize with adults and children. Others have no mother and need more intensive care, including bottle-feeding several times a day.

Due to many foster families going on vacation this summer, we have a huge need for new volunteers. Foster families play a critical role in helping PAWS keep its commitment to not euthanize healthy, adoptable animals by assisting with foster kittens while they mature into young, adoptable cats.

What does it take to be a PAWS foster parent? The answer is simple: love for animals, some time, and some space suitable for young felines. As a PAWS foster parent, you would be responsible for providing fresh food and water to your foster animals, as well as clean litter boxes, proper toys, and of course, the essential ingredients of love and time that will prepare these young orphans for their new, permanent homes. Fostering is a great opportunity for you and your family to help PAWS in a way that both fits your schedule and benefits kittens that need care.

For details about becoming a foster parent visit www.paws.org and look under the shelter tab or contact Foster Care Coordinator Liz Longworth at lizl@paws.org, or 425.787.2500, x822.

Wildlife Center handles thousands of calls

In addition to rehabilitating about 4,500 wild animals each year, the PAWS Wildlife Center takes thousands of calls from the public about animals in distress and human/wildlife conflict situations. Our trained reception staff gives practical advice to people who have found injured or orphaned wildlife. We also offer humane solutions and information about everything from woodpeckers drumming on wooden siding to raccoons eating fruit from trees, squirrels in the attic, and bats in the backyard.

Members of the public with wildlife questions can visit www.paws.org and click on the wildlife tab or call the Wildlife Center at 425.787.2500, x817. The Center is open seven days a week, from 8am to 8pm, through September and 8am to 5pm, October through March. People who call outside these hours can leave a message on our answering machine, and will receive a response within 24 hours.

PAWS for a Bite

PAWS for a Bite... at one of many great Seattle area restaurants. Throughout the month of October 2004, participating restaurants will serve up fantastic food —much of it vegan or vegetarian—and then contribute a percentage of that day’s proceeds to PAWS. For a listing of these animal loving establishments and days in which you definitely want to dine out, visit www.paws.org in September or call 425.787.2500, x800 to have a free descriptive brochure sent right to your door. Eating for a good cause—something everyone can enjoy!

 

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