PAWS People Helping Animals logo
November 7, 2008 

Adopt a furry friend for the holidays!In this issue:

    A Home for the Holidays
    To feed, or not to feed?
    Holiday shopping at PAWS
    Still time to give at work
    Looking to rent a place with your pet?
    Winter supplies needed
    Meet the Varied Thrush

A Home for the Holidays
Photo of Allyson. The streets are no place for an elderly lady like Allyson, a 12-year-old Corgi/Collie mix. Luckily, a kind person who found her wandering as a stray brought her to PAWS. Given how difficult it can be for older dogs like her to compete with younger pups up for adoption, PAWS staff began looking for options to send Allyson to an outside rescue group. But after only 13 days at PAWS, the Starrs picked her as their first family dog.

When asked why they chose Allyson, Brian Starr said his son liked her the best. She's already housetrained, mellow and plays really well with the kids. In addition, Brian said, "Shelter dogs just seem to appreciate you more, as if they know what you did for them."

Happily, Allyson will be spending this holiday in the comfort of her new home. This year, consider making another homeless cat or dog part of yours. Experience the joy of unconditional love by visiting PAWS to meet some furry friends, and give the animals in our care a loving home for the holidays. Adopt today!


To feed, or not to feed?
You care deeply about the wildlife in your community, and as the days grow darker and colder, the temptation to feed them grows stronger. Although putting out food for wild animals can feel like the right thing to do, it actually may cause more harm than good.

Providing them with "unnatural foods," such as bread, pet food and scraps from our own meals may actually cause digestive problems, as well as encourage animals to become dependent on people for food---the last thing you want to do. Read more about the effects of feeding wildlife.

Photo of a Douglas Squirrel.To help wildlife, consider the following instead:

  • Speak up for wildlife habitat protection in your local and state government.
  • Landscape with native plants that provide natural sources of food and shelter. Learn more about native landscaping.
  • Keep your cats indoors or provide them with an escape-proof outdoor enclosure. Even a well-fed cat will hunt.
  • Volunteer at PAWS or another wildlife rehabilitation center.

Read about many more ways to help wildlife and other animals in your community.

Holiday shopping at PAWS
Order your gifts and help animals at the same time. Cool PAWS logo gear, PAWS 2009 Calendar, and unique gifts for those who have everything. Get a head start on your shopping today at PAWS Store.

Still time to give at work
Photo of Jade.Automatic payroll deduction is an easy way to give to the animals. There is still time to donate through your employer's workplace giving campaign, and your gift will go a long way to help the animals in our care. For example, with a pledge of $210---less than $18 a month---you can feed all the dogs and cats at PAWS' shelter for one week.

For more information on your workplace giving program contact your employer's human resources department, or PAWS' Brian Thurston at 425.787.2500 x256 or BrianT@paws.org. Be sure to choose the Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) of Lynnwood when listing your charity of choice. Thank you!


Looking to rent a place with your pet?
It's a tight rental housing market out there, making it harder for people with pets to find a place to live. Check out these tips for renters and these online listings for housing that allows animals.

Winter supplies needed
As we head into winter, PAWS needs a few extra supplies to help us maneuver through the dark, chilly days. Especially needed right now are new 4-to 5-foot cat trees for the cats and kittens to lounge and play on at PAWS Cat City (no 6-footers please). We recently had to throw out all that we had. See our complete winter supplies wish list, and thank you for your generosity!

Meet the Varied Thrush

Photo of a Varied Thrush.
A Varied Thrush in care at PAWS.
Even though it's chillier outside, you can still find a number of interesting birds to watch in your parks and neighborhoods, like the Varied Thrush. This species of bird is what you call an altitudinal migrant---they usually spend summer in the mid to higher elevations and winter in the lowlands.

As PAWS' naturalist Kevin Mack puts it, a Varied Thrush looks a lot like a robin dressed up for a night on the town---with the beautiful black and rust coloring. Listen for the bird's distinctive, metallic whistle on different pitches. In winter look for the Varied Thrush in all types of forests, usually under more dense cover, or in ravines especially near streams.

There is more on Varied Thrushes, including audio of their call, on the Seattle Audubon's BirdWeb.


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A Northwest leader in protecting animals since 1967, the Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) shelters homeless animals, rehabilitates injured and orphaned wildlife, and empowers people to demonstrate compassion and respect for animals in their daily lives.

All rights reserved. 2008 Progressive Animal Welfare Society
PAWS, P.O. Box 1037, Lynnwood, WA 98046